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Fashion

 

Money: In the Eye of the Beholder?

Statistics show that 70% of African youth are unemployed. At a time when job prospects remain bleak, creative thinking and business mind-set is the only way out.

 

Youths must think right to survive. They should take advantage of everything they see, however small. The eye is such an example. It sees, observes, admires and through it emotions surface. The eye cries, glows, shows surprise and sadness. All these give the eye unspoken importance. But as much as

An African wearing eye make-up

its functionaries are significant, most people fail to see its beauty, an aspect that can generate income.

 

In a normal day, a woman will dress up, make her hair and spend more time on the face. She will give the eye special attention, yet it is such a small part of the body.  Why do women enhance beauty in the eye? Why do music divas perfect this art? They do it to put emphasis and draw attention to the eyes, to create eye contact with their fans and ultimately appear beautiful. One more important thing they also do is leave beauticians with money.

 

African sisters have joined this wagon. However, some over do it and ruin the whole beauty aspect. Most salons and beauty parlors are maximizing on this therapy that centers on the whole facial aspect, specifically the eye. It has become booming business as more and more young people enroll in colleges to sharpen skills and open their own salons as an alternative to lack of employment. Beauty has moved from beads, hair, body shape and figure to the face with a specific focus on the eye.

 

As we embrace this new way of expressing beauty, eye make-up has also evolved. The 80s make-up elements were meant to bring out bold eyes and blush to accentuate the cheek bones.  More noticeable was the eye shadow. The heavier the blush, the better you looked as far as the 80s fashion was concerned. Every decade has its own style.

Today's eye makeup trends are radically different, ranging from a "plain" look to a "smoky" effect to a "clean" style. Over time, make-up colors and texture have changed. But one thing always remains the same ‑ the basic construction of the eye.

 

Whether one spends 5 or 50 minutes on make-up, eyebrows, eyelids, eye lashes and the color of the eye give the difference between looking okay and looking fabulous. Shaped eye brows make one look younger, more sophisticated and more rested. On the eyelids, eye shadow is applied and even under the eyebrows. It is used to make the wearer's eyes stand out or look more attractive. The eye shadow adds depth and dimension to one's eyes, complements the eye color, or simply draws attention to the eyes.

Eye lashes on the other hand are better enhanced by mascara.  It is used to darken, thicken and define eyelashes. Mascara comes in different forms and formulas like liquid, cake, cream, tints, and colors. Mascaras emphasize, thicken, lengthen, and define lashes.

The eye does more than just see. It also calls out to be noticed. As tiny as it is, its fundamental role in crowning our inner and outer beauty is no understatement.

Youths need not complain of unemployment when there is a wealth of ideas to exploit. The African woman is going to the ranks of looking more sophisticated, attractive and beautiful. By taking special interest in body parts and the role they play in the society today, beauty parlors need not be for hair only, an eye only beauty place can also mince money from the ladies.



By Monicah Kimeu
Monicah Kimeu is an Intern with Inter Region Economic Network


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